the Vintage Modern shop – vintage, budget chic style for your home & wardrobe

The Vintage Modern shop offers curated, vintage style at budget-friendly prices. It’s like shopping with a team of interior designers without the designer price tag. And you never even have to leave your couch.

bohemian

Women that Inspire Me: Justina Blakeney

Bohemian Style Ideas, Bohemian Home Decor Ideas, Women That Inspire Me, Creative Inspiration, Women in BusinessPamela DeweyComment

Hi friends.

I love Instagram. I love scrolling through Instagram and seeing what painters, crafters, interior designers and writers are creating.

I follow a lot of other female makers because I believe it is important to support other women making their art. And believe me, there are so many women creating beautiful things.

When I see what they are doing, I get inspiration for my painting and writing.

Because so many of these women inspire me, I wanted to share some of these women with you. Some of them I’ve spoken about before, and some of them are incredibly well known. And some of them are well known where I live, in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

So starting today, I will be sharing a little bit about a woman (or a pair of woman) that inspire me. And then I will share some furniture or home décor I created or sourced inspired by these women and what they do.

First up on the list is Justina Blakeney. I’ve written about her before in my blog post 5 Bohemian Looks Worth Stealing for Your Home. Blakeney is the creator of the design blog, TheJungalow.com and the queen of all things bohemian.

Blakeney with her husband and daughter in Blakeney's book,     The New Bohemians: Cool & Collected       Homes

Blakeney with her husband and daughter in Blakeney's book,  The New Bohemians: Cool & Collected Homes

Blakeney draws and paints. She is a pattern-maker, interior designer and a writer.

In addition to her blog, she has written two books, The New Bohemians: Cool & Collected Homes and The New Bohemians Handbook: Come Home to Good Vibes. She is also a designer with multiple product lines.

You can now shop The Jungalow, and there is furniture, art prints, light fixtures, plates, bedding and planters. You can pretty much buy all things boho home décor there.

I love her #newbohemian style, which she describes as having “a passion for color, pattern and plants.” But I also really admire how her creative passions spill into so many different areas. And she doesn’t try to limit herself, but explores all of these different pursuits.

I received a copy of The New Bohemians Handbook: Come Home to Good Vibes for Christmas, and it is just as chock full of inspiration as her previous book.

The book starts out with several maxims, and below are two of my favorites.

Photo of image from Blakeney's book,    The New Bohemians Handbook: Come Home to Good Vibes

Photo of image from Blakeney's book,  The New Bohemians Handbook: Come Home to Good Vibes

Photo of image from Blakeney's book,    The New Bohemians Handbook: Come Home to Good Vibes

Photo of image from Blakeney's book,  The New Bohemians Handbook: Come Home to Good Vibes

I too believe in vintage and handmade and that objects made with love bring that love with them.

Blakeney is a truly talented women who has created a boho empire. And it all started with her blog, The Jungalow.

Here are some #jungalowstyle pieces I have available in the shop. I just added this Starburst Wicker Basket with Lid today, and I am kind of obsessed with it.

Be on the lookout for another woman that inspires me in two weeks!

5 Bohemian Style Looks Worth Stealing for Your Home

Bohemian Style Ideas, Jungalow Style, The New Bohemians, Bohemian Home Decor IdeasPamela DeweyComment

Hi friends.

Does the sight of a macramé curtain make you swoon? Are you all about patterns, layers and plants galore? Well, your desire for all things bohemian can largely be traced to Justina Blakeney's design blog, TheJungalow.com.

Along with being the founder of the go-to source for bohemian design inspiration, Blakeney is also a L.A. based designer and the author of The New Bohemians: Cool & Collected Homes.

So just what is Jungalow style? And what does it mean to be a new bohemian?

Blakeney describes her style as having “a passion for color, pattern and plants.” But more than just being a plant lady, Blakeney also believes “decorating is about feeling free, having fun and getting a little bit wild.”

In other words, Jungalow style is not about design rules, but more about letting your imagination loose and exploring design possibilities.

Though the Jungalow aesthetic emphasizes freedom, many of these new bohemian style homes showcase recurring design themes. So having just bought The New Bohemians: Cool & Collected Homes, I wanted to share 5 of my favorite bohemian home décor looks from Blakeney’s boho handbook.

1.     Embrace mixed patterns.

Mixing patterns is something I’ve started to do more as I get older and become more confident in my style choices. And Blakeney is a master of the pattern mix. She mixes stripes with ikat with polka dots with florals with paisleys and the list keeps on going.

If you want to try mixing patterns, select some colors you want to work with in your space. Then find pieces in a variety of patterns, but within the color story you’ve selected. That way even with multiple patterns in your space, the repeating colors will create a cohesive feel. And mixing patterns provides a truly one-of-a-kind look for your home.

Mixed Patterns. Photo from  The New Bohemians: Cool and Collected Homes .

2.     More is more. Or get down with layers.

More than using a variety of patterns, Blakeney is all about creating layered spaces. There is no room for Scandinavian minimalism in a Jungalow style home. Have a beautiful collection of necklaces? Hang them from a branch in your bedroom. Love plants? Why not turn your bathroom into a little rainforest?

Of course, there is a difference between maximalism and hoarding. Your collections should be organized and attractive. And all your layers should enhance the beauty of your space, not detract from it.

Epic Plant Wall in a Bathroom. Photo from  The New Bohemians: Cool and Collected Homes .

Epic Plant Wall in a Bathroom. Photo from The New Bohemians: Cool and Collected Homes.

3.     Don’t be afraid to use pieces with some patina.

Beauty, as they say, is in the eye of beholder. And anyone who truly embraces bohemian style is not afraid of decorating with pieces that have some wear and tear. One of my favorite pieces in my home is an old trunk that has bit of rust, some dents and more than a few paint splatters. I bought this trunk because of these imperfections. The paint splatters and dents just add to the character. Not to mention, it takes the pressure off having a pristine coffee table in my house. Forget to use a coaster? No big deal. It just adds more patina to the piece.

Or maybe you inherited a chair with peeling leather from your grandfather. So of course you want to hang on to it, because it reminds you of him every time you sit in in. Don’t worry! If you’re going for a Jungalow style look, a chair with peeling leather suddenly looks lived-in, relaxed and distinctly bohemian.

4.     Get creative! Repurpose that basket/pillowcase.

Not everyone has an arsenal of inherited pieces to add to their home. So rather than spending a bunch of money buying new pieces, embrace the new bohemian idea of repurposing existing pieces.

In one of the homes featured in the book, the homeowner took a woven trash can, painted it, turned it over and suddenly, it became an end table. Or like another homeowner does in the book, take a chair with a ripped out seat and replace the seat with pillow covers. And voila, you have chair that is even more beautiful than it was originally.

5.     Macramé!

This one should come as no surprise. Macramé is back in a big way, and it pops up all over the Jungalow style blog, as well as in The New Bohemians. My favorite piece of macramé in the book is the jaw-dropping chandelier pictured below. It has three tiers and tassel fringe. And to pair it with that striped ceiling, it becomes the epitome of new bohemian chic.

Macrame Chandelier from the home of Faith Blakeney. Photo from  The New Bohemians: Cool and Collected Homes . You can see more of her home  here .

Macrame Chandelier from the home of Faith Blakeney. Photo from The New Bohemians: Cool and Collected Homes. You can see more of her home here.

So those are my 5 favorite boho style home décor looks from The New Bohemians: Cool & Collected Homes. Shop some of my favorite #jungalowstyle pieces below. And be on the lookout for more macramé coming soon!

Our Favorite Boho Chic Home Décor Trend

the Vintage Modern shop, vintage macrame, macrame home decor, Minneapolis vintage shopPamela DeweyComment

Hi friends.

Over at the Vintage Modern shop, we are all about embracing the idea everything old is new again. I mean that is literally what we do, we make the old new again.

Our favorite boho chic look that has reemerged as a home decor trend is macramé. It is popping up all over our favorite design blogs—Design*Sponge, The Jungalow and A Beautiful Mess—in the form of macramé plant hangers, wall hangings and curtains.

For those of you unfamiliar with macramé, let us help you out. 

“Macramé or macrame is a form of textile-making using knotting rather than weaving or knitting. Its primary knots are the square knot (a variant of the reef knot) and forms of ‘hitching’: various combinations of half hitches.” -Wikipedia.org

It was popular in the U.S. during the 1970s, lending a bohemian flair to clothing, jewelry and of course, home decor.  However, macramé’s history extends much farther back than that.

“In the Western Hemisphere, macramé is believed to have originated with 13th-century Arab weavers. These artisans knotted the excess thread and yarn along the edges of hand-loomed fabrics into decorative fringes on bath towels, shawls, and veils. The Spanish word macramé is derived from the Arabic migramah, believed to mean ‘striped towel’, ‘ornamental fringe’ or ‘embroidered veil’.” -Wikipedia.org

The art of macramé spread to the U.S. slowly.  

“Sailors made macramé objects in off hours while at sea, and sold or bartered them when they landed, thus spreading the art to places like China and the New World. Nineteenth-century British and American sailors made hammocks, bell fringes and belts from macramé.” -Wikipedia.org

Whatever its origin, we really like the chill vibe a piece of macramé adds to a space. It feels both old and new, perfectly vintage modern.  

If you are feeling the macramé vibe like we are, grab our latest addition. It is an epic macramé plant hanger curtain that was crafted by my lovely mother. (What can I say, I come by the crafting/DIY thing pretty honestly.)

A Long-winded Introduction from the Vintage Modern shop

Pamela Dewey

Hi friends.

My name is Pam Dewey, and the Vintage Modern shop is my new online store. I am the owner, the boss, the designer, the shopper, the stylist, the marketer and the copywriter. I think that about covers it?

A little more about me to start. My mother started taking me to antique stores when I was about five or six years old. From the beginning, I loved all the sparkly, costume jewelry antique stores sell. The more bling, the better.

And I loved the old clothing. I love 50s and 60s style clothing, Dior New Look style dresses with nipped waists and the paisleys and the floral prints of the psychedelic era. There was an extended period of time where I wished I was born in 60s, so I could have lived my true life as a flower child. 

As I got a little older, I began to frequent thrift stores. I searched for the clothes to complete my grunge wardrobe along with cute 50s style cardigans.

When I was In college, shopping at thrift stores became more of necessary part of the broke college student existence.

The year after I graduated, I rented my first solo apartment. I was excited about having my own space, but it also meant furnishing an apartment on my own. I was working as a visual manager for a dying department store, so my home design budget was very modest.

And to be honest, I didn't know much about interior design yet. But my mother was determined to help me create a good looking apartment. (My mother is a retired teacher, but she is also an amateur furniture refinisher and all around crafty lady.)

We took my hand-me-down couch, futon and end tables and added an Asian-inspired table lamp, black and red floral, silk pillows (that my mother made), my parent’s old Persian rug (that nicely covered the stain on the carpet), a few pieces of cheap art, a vintage ice bucket (to hold magazines) and a wicker chair from Pier One. The chair was a horrible dark green, but my mother spray painted it a bright, beautiful red.

All of sudden, I had a living room that looked like a grown person with some taste lived there. I was astonished by what a little bit of styling and creativity could do.

Shortly thereafter, the department store decided to close its doors, and I found out I was about to be out of a job. But it just so happened, my best friend had moved to NYC, and one of his roommates was moving out of their Brooklyn apartment.

I had visited NYC once years ago and loved it then. It seemed like fate. So after an exploratory visit for New Year’s Eve, and I decided to take the plunge.

My former employer was owned by the same company as Saks Fifth Avenue, so I tried to work those connections. Unfortunately, I didn’t have much of a visual portfolio, so the first interview at Saks didn’t go great. But the HR woman did compliment me on my outfit, so it didn’t go terribly either.

In the meantime, I got a sales associate job at H&M. I wanted to work my way up to a visual position, but then I received another call from Saks. I was in.

I worked at Saks Fifth Avenue the rest of my time in NYC. I started as a visual merchandiser and was promoted to a stylist position. Along the way, I learned.

I learned about couture and the fashion industry. I met some fashion designers. I attended a runway show during Fashion Week.

I also learned how to use a hand sander, how to use a staple gun, how to assemble a chandelier and lost all my fear of ladders.

I learned how to create a statement wall with some peacock feathers and a staple gun, to build a chandelier out of Frisbees, to design a snowman out of denim and styrofoam, to create fabric flowers from muslin and liquid starch and how to gold leaf an entire mannequin platform. I also met some crazy talented, wonderful people who shared their knowledge with me.

It was wonderful. It was exhausting. I got burnt out. On the job and on the city.

So I moved to Minneapolis, at the end of 2008. The recession was just taking hold, and I started temping in an accounting office. I eventually was hired on. And then I stayed and stayed.

After I moved to Minnesota, I also started refinishing furniture, basically sanding and painting vintage furniture to give it new life. I started with an abandoned dresser at my old apartment. I spray painted it silver and added new hardware. It looked brand new.

The next piece I refinished was a vintage buffet I inherited from my grandparents. Sometime in the 60s, my grandma painted it the at-the-time popular avocado green. I painted over the unsightly avocado with  black paint. The beautiful lines of the buffet were accentuated with the new, moody dark paint. 

After working inaccounting for awhile, I decided it was time to make a change in my life. I enrolled in a Strategic Communication Master’s program, so I could seek out a new career path, something with some writing involved. Along with fashion and design, writing is my longtime passion.

While completing my degree, I took classes like copywriting, social media communication, advertising and content strategy for web communication. Last spring, I enrolled in my Capstone Class. A capstone is essentially a thesis project people that must be completed to graduate.

On my former blog, I wrote about the “(wo)man in the mirror” moment I had as I was contemplating my Capstone project. You can read that here. It was essentially the moment I ditched my original project idea and decided to write a business plan. A business plan for this business, the Vintage Modern shop.

The Vintage Modern shop provides a way for me to combine all my passions into one project. I get to frequent thrift stores to shop for vintage items that need to be refinished, reimagined or just need to find the right home. Then I get to work on these refinishing projects, write the product copy, market these items online and then blog about the process here.

Here are the last two sentences from my Capstone project.

“Though I know there will be bumps along the way, I will get to funnel my skills of writing copy, social media promotion, and strategic planning into an online store where I sell furniture and art my friends and I have created. It is kind of the dream.”

And I get to be my own boss. So that is how this whole shop came to be. 

I apologize for this longread. Future blog posts will be much shorter.

Going forward, the blog will focus on the refinishing process, as well as things I am learning while running the business.

But today, I wanted to say an incredibly long-winded hello.

Heeeelllllllloooooo.

For fun, I wanted to share a before and after of one of the pieces for sale on the website. I think it turned out pretty great, right?