the Vintage Modern shop – vintage, budget chic style for your home & wardrobe

The Vintage Modern shop offers curated, vintage style at budget-friendly prices. It’s like shopping with a team of interior designers without the designer price tag. And you never even have to leave your couch.

female entrepreneurs

Do You like Beer, Feminism and Vintage?

Minnesota Makers, Minneapolis vintage shop, Women in Business, Minneapolis Vintage ShopPamela DeweyComment

Hi friends!

Well, good news then. The Vintage Modern shop is going to be slinging our vintage wares at two markets next week. And it is even better news if you consider yourself a feminist, or like to drink beer.

Or all three. I mean, I really hope you like all three things. (But more so, the feminism thing.)

On Thursday March 8th, the shop is participating in the FeMNist Night Market at the Grain Belt Bottling House in NE Minneapolis. The event is from 5-10pm and will feature female Minnesota artists, makers and businesses. We will be up on the second floor of the building, set up as part of the Wellness Lounge. So come chill out and say hi!

 

The event is at the Grain Belt Bottling House in NE MPLS from 5-10pm. Click  here  for details.

The event is at the Grain Belt Bottling House in NE MPLS from 5-10pm. Click here for details.

The Vintage Modern shop will also be at Refind Vintage Market at Modist Brewing in the North Loop of Minneapolis on Sunday March 11th. The event is from 12-5 pm and will feature a curated selection of vintage sellers. So beer + vintage = a very good Sunday.

The event is at Modist Brewing in the North Loop of MPLS from 12-5pm. Click  here  for details.

The event is at Modist Brewing in the North Loop of MPLS from 12-5pm. Click here for details.

The FeMNist Night Market is being put on by Still Kickin, Nora McInerny and The Coven.

Still Kickin is a charity founded by Nora McInerny and her friend, Lindsay. After Nora lost her husband to brain cancer, she created this nonprofit organization inspired by his favorite thrift store shirt. By selling t-shirts and other merchandise, Still Kickin is able to create “a safety net for other awesome people who find themselves going through awful things.” Every month, they pick a Still Kickin Hero and “give them the proceeds from our merchandise sales, donation-based workouts and other events held both in the Twin Cities area and around the country.

And on personal note, I am a big fan of Nora's writing. Her book, It's Okay to Laugh: Crying is Cool Too, meant a lot to me. The book is about love, grief, beauty, pain and all the other messy stuff in-between. Writing about grief is hard, and Nora does it with beauty and honesty. It made me laugh and cry, as promised. It is definitely worth a read. I've recommended it to just about everyone I know.

The Coven is a "collaborative community and co-working space for women and those who identify as non-binary" in Minneapolis. The community offers events and workshops and strives to empower its members to "become the absolute best version of [themselves] through connection, collaboration, and content."

The Refind Vintage Market is hosted by Minneapolis Craft Market and the vintage boutique, THE KEEP. According to their site, THE KEEP was founded "to bring a modern aesthetic to vintage clothing." The founders, Kathryn and Latricia, believe "the best looks come from mixing the PAST with the PRESENT."

Hope to see you next week! The shop will have some exclusive, new-to-you vintage merchandise available at these markets.

3 Strengths that Help Women Crush the Business World

Women in BusinessPamela DeweyComment

Hi friends.

“For years, as I said earlier, I sort of fought the idea that women are ‘different’ than men…Hey, we’re all just people, and each one of us unique…I always resisted the notion that either gender-men or women-might possess inherent qualities that made it inherently ‘different’ or ‘better’ at business than the other. But as recovering research analyst, I always try to let the research speak to me, and when I started to drill down on these issues, what I found surprised me. The research shows that women do bring ‘different’ traits to the office that are good for business.” –Sallie Krawcheck Own It: The Power of Women at Work

I am with Sally here. I have also fought the idea women are inherently different than men.

I think it's safe to say many of differences between men and women are caused by how the differently our society treats men and women. (Like how we are paid differently, how our bodies are viewed differently, etc., etc.).

But if we accept that men and women are inherently different, we can reject the idea that women need to act like men to succeed in business.

In her book Own It: The Power of Women at Work, Krawcheck shares her experiences as the former CEO of Smith Barney and Merrill Lynch Wealth Management, as well as the current CEO of Ellevest. She explores how women can use their traditionally female traits to their advantage.

More specifically, she lists 6 strengths that position women for more business success than their male counterparts.

For this post, I focused on 3 strengths that resonated particularly with me.

1.        Women are better at relationships.

Krawcheck writes, “There is research to back up the claim that women are more empathetic, better connectors, and natural relationship-builders- all skills that matter enormously for success in business.”

Before I launched my business, I took a strengths assessment to determine my top 5 strengths. I thought learning my strengths would help me leverage these skills to build my business.

The assessment revealed my number one strength is empathy.

I use my empathy whenever I am thinking about how to improve my customers’ shopping experience. It is the reason I keep my prices low, as well as why the shop offers free shipping and free delivery.

2.        Women love to learn.

Krawcheck writes, “Increasingly, I’ve recognized that we women love to learn and that we do better at jobs which we’re acquiring new skills. We’re 57 percent of college graduates and 62 percent of master’s degree grads. And we don’t just love to learn; we’re also good at it: a recent analysis found girls making higher grades than boys overall.”

Like I said, before I launched my business, I completed an assessment to learn my top strengths, a move I thought would teach me more about myself.

But before that, I was working toward my master’s degree in Strategic Communication. I developed the idea for the Vintage Modern shop as a Capstone project for the program.

3.        Women are more risk aware. 

Krawcheck writes,“So what can women’s risk awareness offer to businesses? For one a lot more transparency. For another, a lot better decision-making. Our risk awareness not only means we make fewer mistakes, it also means we have a greater ability to dial back from the mistakes we do make. As leaders and managers, it means recognizing the difference between confidence and competence. It means us actively working to know our blind spots.”

The business and marketing plan I wrote for the Vintage Modern shop was incredibly thorough. My professor jokingly referred to it as “the Moby Dick of Capstone projects.”

I wanted to make sure I understood how much it cost to start a business. I also wanted to understand the market I would be entering, my competition and my target customer.

Evaluating all these things helped me figure out if my business could be successful.

Happily, I learned that the market wasn’t oversaturated, and my Moby Dick of a paper led to opening the Vintage Modern shop.

As previously mentioned, in her book, Own It: The Power of Women at Work, Krawcheck gives an additional 3 strengths women can use to their advantage in the business world. She also includes a lot of other useful information about succeeding as a businesswoman.

If that interests you, I would recommend grabbing a copy from your local library or bookstore

  

Own It: The Power of Women at Work by Sallie Krawcheck

Own It: The Power of Women at Work by Sallie Krawcheck